Impeccably Flawed

Being sex-negative doesn’t mean that I fancy myself the chief inspector of the sex police, or that I am personally judging what you do in bed, or that I’m conservative, or that I’m engaging in repressive moralizing. It doesn’t mean that I hate sex workers, or that I want to ban sex work or porn (and, in general, I tend to leave those conversations to women who do sex work while I shut up and listen to what they have to say). It doesn’t mean that I hate sex or that I’m embarrassed by it.

What it does, in fact, mean is that the way you fuck is not “private,” apolitical, or outside the realm of critique. Sex does not happen in a vacuum immune to outside structural influences; in fact, it can (and does) replicate inescapable systems of power and dominance. Being sex-negative means acknowledging that sex, and kink, have nothing intrinsically “good” or “positive” about them (in direct contrast to sex-positive feminists, many of whom argue that sex is an inherent good and that less charitable opinions toward sex are the result of a poisonous, prudish society).

It means understanding that many women have neutral to negative experiences with sex, whether due to a lack of desire or sensitivity or past traumatic experiences or myriad other reasons, or may not wish to have sex at all, and that none of this makes them unhealthy, aberrant, or wrong.
African American adolescents tend to have more success in school if their parents instill in them a sense of racial pride, reducing their vulnerability to the effects of racial discrimination from teachers and peers.

westindian-alien:

blacksupervillain:

invisiblelad:

yungvenuz:

sixpenceee:

Mayflys are a winged insect that have a short lifespan. They mate in such a way that all of them mature in the exact same time. The will die out soon, but for the time being Wisconsin looks like something straight out of a horror movie. 

SOURCE

nnnnnnuh

It’s not the idea of an insect that I find disturbing. It’s swarms. :/

I would die

this is fucking disgusting

OHMYGOSH I would never go outside. 

(via brydeswhale)

grilledcheese4evr:

petalpunx:

stay away from people who make you feel like you are hard to love

This is the most important thing I have ever read.

(via augustjustice)

thebicker:

Did Ridley Scott’s “Exodus” movie give the Sphinx a white/European makeover?

The backlash against Ridley Scott’s Exodus is gathering momentum. After Noah’s mixed reception earlier this year, more and more people are sick of seeing movies with “whitewashed” casts: White actors representing historical figures who almost certainly were not white.

The latest accusation of Exodus whitewashing relates to someone who technically isn’t even a character: the Sphinx.

The likeliest explanation is that the sculpture in this picture is not the Sphinx, but is in fact a statue of Ramses. This means that it would have been based on actor Joel Edgerton’s face. 

Unfortunately, this just makes the whitewashed casting even more blatant, because real statues of Ramses II simply do not look like that. So while Exodus may not have made a “white version” of the Sphinx, Egyptian culture is still being erased and rewritten to fit in with the film’s predominantly white cast of actors.

[READ MORE]

tl;dr, yes, they made an Egyptian statue’s face white.

(Source: hellotailor, via bespectaculared)

fyeahcracker:

white people: don’t blame us for our ancestors! i’m not responsible for those white people or what they did just because we’re the same color!

same white people: look at all these inventions you poc wouldn’t have without white people! i didn’t invent any of it but i’ma take responsibility for these ancestors just based on being the same skin color!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(via cosmolatte)

thatdrumsbeatingloudandclear:

breadmaakesyoufat:

thatskrillmau5chick:

supermoclel:

a brony called me unattractive

that’s

image

 right

image

he

imagecalled

image

me

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ugly

image

because i have hair on my legs

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Self absorbed Bitch.

remember kids, if you think you’re attractive and you don’t hate yourself or your body than you’re self absorbed! society is only happy when you’re miserable, ugh. you work it girl!

You’re beautiful.

(via ourlivesarentjustmeasuredinyears)

tiaraloveskandlupita:

Black Excellence▶◀  Michaela DePrince 

"It means the world to me to be a role model"

(via misandry-mermaid)

waluiqi:

when u reblog one of those ask game things and nobody sends u anything

image

(via ourlivesarentjustmeasuredinyears)

quickweaves:

I just think it’s an incredibly ridiculous and extremely harmful notion that southern racism is somehow worse than racism experienced in the north east and out west the it’s just a different system to navigate and different culture it occupies I just feel like lures poc into…

  • Straight haired person: Just comb it!
  • Curly haired person:

someoneinjersey:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

(via dreadlocksofsteel)

lavender-ice:

cindermella:

this is painfully accurate.

omfg

(via curiouskitty)

toblackgirls:


Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain
Long before the Empire Windrush arrived on British shores in 1948 there were women of African descent in Britain. Black women were here to witness the construction of Hadrian’s Wall in Roman Britain and everyday life over the centuries, in the markets and music halls, homes and factories.
 Re-imagine gives us a glimpse of some of these women, the traces of their lives lying in vaults of archives, libraries and museums across the United Kingdom and brought together for the first time.
 Side by side. Face to face. Courageous women who, throughout generations have been brave. We invite you to ‘re-imagine’ their lives, to create a tapestry of stories that paint a picture of the many and eclectic roles of Black women over time. 24 July – 30 November 2014 FREE admission @bcaheritage #reimagine

If you are in London, or can get to London, please do yourself a favour and head on to Brixton to visit the Black Cultural Archives opening exhibition, Re-Imagine: Black Women in Britain.
I attended the opening of the Archives last week held and I have no words for it. There are no words to describe the significance of 3000 or so Black people gathering on Windrush Square, taking back Brixton from the growing wave of white middle class gentrifiers. It was moving, really and truly. The feeling continued later when seemingly everyone spilled into Brixton Village Market and again took back a space that has been stolen from Brixton’s black community. 
The exhibition itself acts to fill in silences around Britain’s Black women, tracing the history of Black women from the as early as pre-19th century and ending with Doreen Lawrence. The narrative of Black women in Britain is growingly characterised by glaring omission and invisibility but this space throws the narrative to the wind: Black women are not invisible, they are here for you to see. There is Olive Morris in one corner and her mother in another; Mary Seacole’s photograph is proudly displayed beside that of Jessica Huntley. 
Please, please go and see it. You will not regret it. 

toblackgirls:

Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain

Long before the Empire Windrush arrived on British shores in 1948 there were women of African descent in Britain. Black women were here to witness the construction of Hadrian’s Wall in Roman Britain and everyday life over the centuries, in the markets and music halls, homes and factories.


Re-imagine gives us a glimpse of some of these women, the traces of their lives lying in vaults of archives, libraries and museums across the United Kingdom and brought together for the first time.


Side by side. Face to face. Courageous women who, throughout generations have been brave. We invite you to ‘re-imagine’ their lives, to create a tapestry of stories that paint a picture of the many and eclectic roles of Black women over time.

24 July – 30 November 2014
FREE admission

@bcaheritage #reimagine

If you are in London, or can get to London, please do yourself a favour and head on to Brixton to visit the Black Cultural Archives opening exhibition, Re-Imagine: Black Women in Britain.

I attended the opening of the Archives last week held and I have no words for it. There are no words to describe the significance of 3000 or so Black people gathering on Windrush Square, taking back Brixton from the growing wave of white middle class gentrifiers. It was moving, really and truly. The feeling continued later when seemingly everyone spilled into Brixton Village Market and again took back a space that has been stolen from Brixton’s black community. 

The exhibition itself acts to fill in silences around Britain’s Black women, tracing the history of Black women from the as early as pre-19th century and ending with Doreen Lawrence. The narrative of Black women in Britain is growingly characterised by glaring omission and invisibility but this space throws the narrative to the wind: Black women are not invisible, they are here for you to see. There is Olive Morris in one corner and her mother in another; Mary Seacole’s photograph is proudly displayed beside that of Jessica Huntley. 

Please, please go and see it. You will not regret it. 

(via dreadlocksofsteel)